Approaching Feminism as a Male Data Scientist

Painting Equality used with permission from artist Osnat Tzadok, find original here.

The internet has provided a new platform for an obscene amount of information. Anyone with a computer and a connection can now be heard in the international community. Through the accessibility of information, citizens have become journalists, comedians, celebrities, laughing stocks, community leaders and even scientists just through the means of access to this information tsunami. One particular aspect of this is the ability for marginalized groups to directly confront those who are more privileged, or even perpetrate that marginalization. Continue reading

A Beautiful Song: The Adaptive Music of NieR: Automata

There is something special about NieR: Automata. Developed by Platinum Games and released in 2017, NieR: Automata is a sequel to the cult classic game NieR (Cavia, 2010). Set thousands of years in the future, NieR: Automata is an action role playing game where the player takes control of androids 2B, 9S and A2. Their aim is to rid the earth of alien machines and pave the way for the last humans, who have settled on the moon, to return to earth. Keichii Okabe, the composer for NieR/NieR: Automata and the Drakengard series, uses adaptive music rescored from previous games with aims to induce emotions within the player-character connection.

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How Artificial Intelligence Can Augment Game Composers, Part 1

The famous entrepreneur Ray Kurzweil predicted that by 2029 brains will merge with machines, making people smarter than ever. Even if most of the time we don’t realise it, machines and artificial intelligence (AI) are already extending our capabilities.  Think of the last time you visited a website in a language you can’t speak. I would guess you understood its content anyway, thanks to the decent translation provided by Google.  What about the last time you asked an AI assistant (Siri, Alexa, Cortana etc.) to find information for you?

In this blog post series, I outline how AI can augment human composers.  In particular, I’ll touch on the techniques and the opportunities that AI opens to games composers for adaptive music.  (If you don’t know what adaptive music is, have a look at this post I wrote a few months ago for a brief introduction).  This first post is going to prepare the field, discussing some of the limitations composers face when working with adaptive music.

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8 Outstanding Adaptive Music Soundtracks

We’re always thinking of great examples of game soundtracks here at Melodrive HQ. We decided to come up with our own personal list of the best-of-the-best when it comes to adaptive music in games.

If you’re not sure what we mean when we say ‘adaptive music’, you should check out one of our previous posts, where we talked about the idea in some detail. TL;DR, adaptive music is dynamic and ever-changing. It reacts to the player and the game to intensify the immersion and emotion in the game, and (hopefully) improves their experience.

By the way, this list is just in chronological order and by no means ranks the games.

Without further ado, here’s the list!

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Interview with Game Composer Guy Whitmore: “Adaptive music isn’t important for games, it’s mandatory!”

Last month, I had the honour of interviewing game composer Guy Whitmore. We shared ideas on video game music with a specific focus on the use of adaptive techniques in video games. He shared some great insights on the future of music making in video games. Guy has been around in the  video games industry for more than 20 years. He has specialised in adaptive music. You can say he’s an adaptive music evangelist and educator! For a quick introduction on adaptive music, check this post I wrote some time ago. Guy worked as an audio director and a composer for big companies like Electronic Arts and Microsoft but also as a freelancer. He’s the author of notable game scores like Die Hard: Nakatomi Plaza, Shivers and Shogo. Next, you can read the content of our great chat.

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Interview with Grammy-winning composer Jacob Collier

We stopped in sunny LA at Quincy Jones’ office to meet up with the incredible Jacob Collier and discuss musical bluffs, rhythmic cadences and mind mappings.

Before diving into our Q&A, Jacob and I had a wonderful talk about the future of technology in music. We found that our visions to be surprisingly aligned. Jacob is a man consumed by the mapping of emotion to different musical components. He said that he has always experienced and explored harmonies in a very emotional way–feeling out the different chords based almost purely on his personal perception. At Melodrive, one of our main tenets is to bridge the gap between computers and musical emotion.

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How to use Pure Data in Unity

Ever wanted to do more with the music or SFX in your game? Maybe you want to go beyond triggering audio clips with basic effects towards infinite variations of explosions or gunfire? Maybe your player characters are robots and you want to vocode the player’s microphone input? Perhaps you want complete playable instruments within your game, or unique melodies composed for each user-generated character a la Spore?

If so, then using Pure Data (Pd for short) may be just what you need. Sure, you can do a lot of these things using FMOD and Wwise, but Pd makes the process so simple and elegant, and best of all: it’s free. If this sounds like your cup of tea, then read on!

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How to Choose the Right Music Genre for the Soundtrack of a Video Game

It might seem a like simple process, but picking the right music genre for a game soundtrack is a challenging task. The musical styles are almost infinite: free jazz, fusion, epic rock, late romantic, Gregorian,  gypsy folk; to list just a few options available. Should you use a traditional classical orchestral style for your new RPG game or should you try an unexpected solution like trance music? As we know, music can make or break a game and the genre plays a major part in the process. In this article, I’ll give you some guidelines,  inspired by the great book A Composer’s Guide to Game Music written by Winfred Phillips, on how to pick a music genre for your game that will (hopefully) resonate with your players. Before delving into this, let’s have a short detour on game genres, which, as we’ll see, are deeply intertwined with music genres.

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How to Plan the Soundtrack of a Video Game Effectively: A Guide to Music Conceptualisation

The first step to create a good score for a game is to conceptualise the music. Music conceptualisation can be compared to sketching the blueprint for a building. Before you get into the details of how to decorate the rooms of the building, you need to decide how many floors there are, the size of each floor and the number of rooms. Similarly, music conceptualisation is necessary to set the stylistic, creative and functional goals of the music before the composer starts working on the actual notes. Consider conceptualisation as a high-level music planning activity.

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5 Methods To Get Music for your Video Game: Pros and Cons

In this post I’m going to analyse the pros and cons of some of the strategies available to get music for video games, and help you decide which might be the best for you.

We all know that music is particularly important for video games. A soundtrack sets the overall tone of the game and it shapes the experience of a player without them really noticing it. Music can also provide clues about the situation the player is in and make a game stand out from the crowd. Think of the Skyrim main theme for example… you probably just need the initial three drum hits to recognise the game. That’s great branding!

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