Month: March 2017

Interview with Game Composer Guy Whitmore: “Adaptive music isn’t important for games, it’s mandatory!”

Last month, I had the honour of interviewing game composer Guy Whitmore. We shared ideas on video game music with a specific focus on the use of adaptive techniques in video games. He shared some great insights on the future of music making in video games. Guy has been around in the  video games industry for more than 20 years. He has specialised in adaptive music. You can say he’s an adaptive music evangelist and educator! For a quick introduction on adaptive music, check this post I wrote some time ago. Guy worked as an audio director and a composer for big companies like Electronic Arts and Microsoft but also as a freelancer. He’s the author of notable game scores like Die Hard: Nakatomi Plaza, Shivers and Shogo. Next, you can read the content of our great chat.

Continue reading

Interview with Grammy-winning composer Jacob Collier

We stopped in sunny LA at Quincy Jones’ office to meet up with the incredible Jacob Collier and discuss musical bluffs, rhythmic cadences and mind mappings.

Before diving into our Q&A, Jacob and I had a wonderful talk about the future of technology in music. We found that our visions to be surprisingly aligned. Jacob is a man consumed by the mapping of emotion to different musical components. He said that he has always experienced and explored harmonies in a very emotional way–feeling out the different chords based almost purely on his personal perception. At Melodrive, one of our main tenets is to bridge the gap between computers and musical emotion.

Continue reading

How to use Pure Data in Unity

Ever wanted to do more with the music or SFX in your game? Maybe you want to go beyond triggering audio clips with basic effects towards infinite variations of explosions or gunfire? Maybe your player characters are robots and you want to vocode the player’s microphone input? Perhaps you want complete playable instruments within your game, or unique melodies composed for each user-generated character a la Spore?

If so, then using Pure Data (Pd for short) may be just what you need. Sure, you can do a lot of these things using FMOD and Wwise, but Pd makes the process so simple and elegant, and best of all: it’s free. If this sounds like your cup of tea, then read on!

Continue reading

How to Choose the Right Music Genre for the Soundtrack of a Video Game

It might seem a like simple process, but picking the right music genre for a game soundtrack is a challenging task. The musical styles are almost infinite: free jazz, fusion, epic rock, late romantic, Gregorian,  gypsy folk; to list just a few options available. Should you use a traditional classical orchestral style for your new RPG game or should you try an unexpected solution like trance music? As we know, music can make or break a game and the genre plays a major part in the process. In this article, I’ll give you some guidelines,  inspired by the great book A Composer’s Guide to Game Music written by Winfred Phillips, on how to pick a music genre for your game that will (hopefully) resonate with your players. Before delving into this, let’s have a short detour on game genres, which, as we’ll see, are deeply intertwined with music genres.

Continue reading

© 2017 Melodrive blog