Tag: video game music

How to Choose the Right Music Genre for the Soundtrack of a Video Game

It might seem a like simple process, but picking the right music genre for a game soundtrack is a challenging task. The musical styles are almost infinite: free jazz, fusion, epic rock, late romantic, Gregorian,  gypsy folk; to list just a few options available. Should you use a traditional classical orchestral style for your new RPG game or should you try an unexpected solution like trance music? As we know, music can make or break a game and the genre plays a major part in the process. In this article, I’ll give you some guidelines,  inspired by the great book A Composer’s Guide to Game Music written by Winfred Phillips, on how to pick a music genre for your game that will (hopefully) resonate with your players. Before delving into this, let’s have a short detour on game genres, which, as we’ll see, are deeply intertwined with music genres.

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How to Plan the Soundtrack of a Video Game Effectively: A Guide to Music Conceptualisation

The first step to create a good score for a game is to conceptualise the music. Music conceptualisation can be compared to sketching the blueprint for a building. Before you get into the details of how to decorate the rooms of the building, you need to decide how many floors there are, the size of each floor and the number of rooms. Similarly, music conceptualisation is necessary to set the stylistic, creative and functional goals of the music before the composer starts working on the actual notes. Consider conceptualisation as a high-level music planning activity.

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5 Methods To Get Music for your Video Game: Pros and Cons

In this post I’m going to analyse the pros and cons of some of the strategies available to get music for video games, and help you decide which might be the best for you.

We all know that music is particularly important for video games. A soundtrack sets the overall tone of the game and it shapes the experience of a player without them really noticing it. Music can also provide clues about the situation the player is in and make a game stand out from the crowd. Think of the Skyrim main theme for example… you probably just need the initial three drum hits to recognise the game. That’s great branding!

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What is Adaptive Music?

We may not be aware of it, but most music that we’re used to listen to is linear. Linear music has a beginning, a development and an ending that sound exactly the same every time we listen to it. The soundtrack of a movie, the songs of Bob Dylan and a Mozart’s symphony are all examples of linear music. Linear music works great if it’s used for concert music or as  musical background for fixed media. Every time we watch Star Wars, for instance, the sequence of events occurring on screen are always the same. No matter how much we would like it to be different, (40-year-old spoiler alert) Obi-Wan Kenobi is going to be killed by Darth Vader! The fixed structure of a movie is great for the composer who has to write the soundtrack, because he or she can create musical cues that are specifically tailored to the on-screen images on a moment-by-moment basis. When the cannons of the Millennium Falcon hit the ships of the Empire, for example, the explosions can be underlined by the music and the overall excitement of the moment can be captured and enhanced by the soundtrack.

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